Land Degradation

Trash

Climate Change

Dredging

Pesticides

Deforestation

Threats

There are many threats that mangrove habitats face, depleting their populations through unsustainable developments and deforestation

Pollution

Developments

Endangered

Rising Sea Levels

Farming

Clearing 

Coastal Erosion

Overpopulation

Habitat Loss

Housing

Dumping

Plastics

Mangrove forests are often withstanding structures, resilient to natural disasters and anthropogenic disturbances. However, there has been an increase in the occurrences of these threats that can inflict permanent damage to mangrove populations and the ecosystems they harbour. Despite efforts to control and mitigate these threats that mangroves and other endangered habitats may face - it is clear that not only in the Cayman Islands, these issues are prevalent on a global scale. 

Issues at Hand

Deforestation - Land Developments

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Despite the significance of these coastal areas, Grand Cayman has lost much of its original mangrove cover. More than 50% of the island was originally covered in mangrove forests but most of the wetlands on the western end of the island have been converted to residential and commercial developments. Fortunately, in the centre of the island the Central Mangrove Wetland, the largest contiguous mangrove ecosystem in the Caribbean, remains largely undisturbed – it is, however, being encroached upon from all sides by rapidly increasing development pressures.

Unsustainable Developments

Mangrove Cement.HEIC

Effects:

Cement Dumping

Yep! Thats all cement.

Mangrove development has now gained momentum and large tracts of mangroves have been reclaimed for housing, converted to canals and condominiums, deforested by local contractors - without sufficient and wise reforestation. The removal of these mangroves have proven to reduce sediment stability as well as contribute to greenhouse gas release - counteracting the fixation of carbon done by these extensive wetlands. 

Mangrove Floods.jpg
  • Here's visible flooding following the removal of mangroves in Cayman. These pockets of water must then be dredged along with the peat - RELEASING BLUE CARBON - in order to acquire stable foundation for further development.

Recent: MANGROVE CLEARING IN RED BAY

An illegal mangrove clearing in Red Bay, the home district of Premier Alden McLaughlin, was brought to the attention of the Mangrove Rangers Wednesday afternoon. 

 

Clearing work was ongoing when a ranger visited the site Wednesday, despite two cease-and-desist orders that had already been issued by the Department of Environment. One order has been issued to the construction company and another to the developer.

A DoE officer confirmed the works at the end of Selkirk Drive and Abbey Way had not been granted planning permission. The illegal clearing is another example of a brazen violation of the Species Conservation Plan for Mangroves, which took effect in April 2020.

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That plan establishes

 “mangroves may not be taken, meaning they may not be killed, collected, destroyed, damaged, or harmed,”

unless planning permission has been granted.

When asked about the site, Premier McLaughlin said the land is private and government cannot deny the right to develop private land.

“I think people forget that the whole of Red Bay and most of Prospect was like that when I was a boy 50 years ago. A lot of mangroves were cleared to make way for the land our houses currently sit on,” McLaughlin wrote.

“Government can't simply take away a person’s right to develop their own land in accordance with its zoning without paying compensation.”

The Species Conservation Plan for Mangroves, however, does not specify exemptions for private landowners and planning permission must still be acquired before landowners may clear mangrove habitat. Mangrove Rangers founder Martin Keeley decried the “piratical attitude” of the construction industry with regard to the islands’ planning and environment laws.

“It's just about a year since the Species Conservation Plan for Mangroves became Law.  We have distributed the law extensively to those in the development, landscaping and construction industries and so there is no excuse for this kind of illegal clearing,” he said.

 "Once again, the developer has gone in and cleared the mangroves with no, zero, planning permission. The next part of the plan will be to have a wrist slap by the CPA and a miniscule fine.

"This also seems to be the general attitude pervading the island - that mangroves can be cleared with no consequences and the law cavalierly broken. Knowing as we do the true value of the mangrove ecosystem, it is time for this illegal process to stop."

Clearing Site on Selkirk Dr

As construction projects accelerate ahead of the 14 April election, the Mangrove Rangers will continue to monitor works for violations of the Species Conservation Plan. Anyone who has spotted a suspected violation of the mangrove policy may contact the rangers at 923-9000 or info@mangroverangers.ky.

What You Can Do:

Write to Premier Alden McLaughin, the Governor, Minister Seymour, DOE and to your Local MLA to ensure that the Mangrove Species Conservation Law is addressed in every planning proposal and every situation that involves the destruction of these habitats in any way. 

And of course, you can contact the Mangrove Rangers at via email or by phone. Send us a message on how to get involved with the Mangrove Action.

This all relates back to the fundamental role of the Mangrove Rangers - here to raise awareness by educating others go the hidden/ignored threats that mangroves face here in the Cayman Islands, Infrastructural Development. We want our community to get involved and help to make a difference on our islands. 

Comments About This Recent Case

Apply for planning permission when you want to build something useful, let the mangroves be until then. It is simple. It isn't taking anyone's rights away, just being sensible. 

Unfortunately, the illegal clearing of mangroves in the Cayman Islands is a common issue, and one that needs to be seriously addressed. However, the fines for illegally clearing mangroves are not high enough to dissuade developers.

We definitely agree! Unfortunately some developers find it easier to apply for after-the-fact permits and paying a small fine.

Can anything be saved? Will anyone do this the right way for once?

Pollution - Waste Management

Mangrove development has now gained momentum and large tracts of mangroves have been reclaimed for housing, converted to canals and condominiums, deforested by local contractors - without sufficient and wise reforestation. The removal of these mangroves have proven to reduce sediment stability as well as contribute to greenhouse gas release - counteracting the fixation of carbon done by these extensive wetlands.